Anna Lichtwarck-Aschoffonline

Short bio

Assistant Professor at the Developmental Psychopathology Department, mainly interested in general processes and principles of clinical change; mother of two wild boys.

Top-3 games
  1. Pool
  2. Basketball
  3. Schafkopf
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About me

I am born in the southern part of Germany and moved all the way up to the northern part of the Netherlands to study psychology in Groningen. I received my PhD from the University of Groningen at the department of Developmental Psychology in 2008. Currently, I am working as an assistant professor at the Radboud University Nijmegen in the research program Developmental Psychopathology. Generally, I am not so interested in whether certain interventions work but how they work. That is, I am mainly focusing on underlying processes and mechanisms of change across diagnostic categories and different treatment modalities. Eventually I hope that by understanding individual processes of change we will be able to personalize and tailor treatments to the specific needs of clients. My interest in game interventions is mainly driven by the fact that they allow us to gather fine-grained data on how individuals change across game play. Moreover, I find it inspiring to work with game developers. Although coming from very different backgrounds the linking pin for me is the explicit translation of a theory about how humans behave and change into mechanisms (or game mechanics).

Projects I’ve worked on

  • Category
    Resilience
    Date
    01/02/2017
    Study/Course
    Location

    Can I Play Some More? Promoting Adolescent Wellbeing Through Engaging Video Games

    About the project

    Commercial video games may offer a cheap and readily available way to help us understand in what way video games can be used to promote adolescent wellbeing. Excellent targets for this are games that involve social interaction, encourage both positive and negative emotions and are identified by youth themselves as potentially beneficial. By letting youth play several commercial video games in different settings, we can learn how games interact with wellbeing in both short and long-term.

    view this project

  • Category
    Anxiety
    Date
    21/10/2018
    Study/Course
    Location

    Are Improvements in Anxiety Associated with How Children Play MindLight?

    About the project

    The video game MindLight has been found to be an effective anxiety prevention program (see project: MindLight - Childhood Anxiety Prevention). However, we don’t know whether the clinical techniques incorporated in the game were responsible for the observed changes in anxiety symptoms. In this project we examined how children play MindLight, to what extent they interact with the clinical techniques in the game and how that relates to their anxiety improvements.

    view this project

  • Category
    Anxiety
    Date
    21/10/2018
    Study/Course
    Location

    MindLight - Childhood Anxiety Prevention

    About the project

    Many children have difficulties with fearful situations and are anxious. Interventions can help to teach children to cope effectively with anxiety-inducing situations. In our project, we rigorously tested whether an intervention in the form of a video game (MindLight) is effective in significantly reducing anxiety symptoms in children 8-12 years old. We did this by comparing MindLight to 1) a commercial game and 2) the gold-standard, cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety (Coping Cat). Furthermore, we aim to evaluate the reasons for why MindLight is effective (e.g., what kinds of mechanics work) and for whom (e.g., age and gender differences).

    view this project

  • Category
    Gaming
    Date
    21/10/2018
    Study/Course
    Location

    Nonspecific Factors in Video Games for Mental Health

    About the project

    More and more games are designed to promote mental health. If these games are found to be effective, it is important to investigate which factors are responsible for the improvements in mental health. Most often, this type of research focuses on the specific clinical techniques that were designed into the game. However, from the clinical literature it is known that, for instance, expectations, motivation, and one’s mindset about the malleability of symptoms play a major role in positive intervention outcomes. In my project I aim to investigate these nonspecific factors and examine how we can manipulate these factors in order to optimize video games for mental health.

    view this project

My updates

  • 23
    March
    UNTILL
    25
    March
    About the event

    International Convention of Psychological Science

    Location

    Vienna, Austria

    A large group of GEMH Lab members will be presenting our various study findings in a series of symposia, talks and poster sessions. We'll be sharing our latest findings, our challenges, our breakthroughs and, of course, our games!

My publications

  • Videospellen: De Positieve Effecten

    Granic, I., Lobel, A., Poppelaars, M., & Engels, R. C. M. E. (2015). Kind en Adolescent, 36 (1), 1-22. doi:10.1007/s12453-014-0066-8

    Author: Marlou Poppelaars

    Upload date: 03-01-2015

  • A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Two Cognitive-Behavioral Programs for Adolescent Girls with Subclinical Depression: A School-Based Program (Op Volle Kracht) and a Computerized Program (SPARX)

    Poppelaars, M., Tak, Y. R., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., Engels, R. C. M. E., Lobel, A., Merry, S. N., Lucassen, M. F. G., & Granic, I. (2016). Behaviour Research and Therapy, 80, 33-42. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2016.03.005

    Author: Marlou Poppelaars

    Upload date: 05-01-2016

  • Autonomous and Controlled Motivation in a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing School-based and Computerized Depression Prevention Programs

    Poppelaars, M., Tak, Y. R., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., Engels, R. C. M. E., Lobel, A., Merry, S. N., Lucassen, M. F. G., & Granic, I. (2014). In Schouten, B., Fedtke, S., Schijven, M., Vosmeer, M. & Gekker, A. (Eds.), Games for Health 2014 (pp. 125-135). Germany: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. doi: 10.1007/978-3-658-07141-7_17

    Author: Marlou Poppelaars

    Upload date: 10-29-2014

  • Explicit Mental Health Messaging Promotes Serious Video Game Selection in Youth with Elevated Mental Health Symptoms

    Poppelaars, M., Wols, A., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., & Granic, I. (2018). Frontiers in Psychology.

    Author: Marlou Poppelaars

    Upload date: 09-10-2018

  • In-Game Play Behaviours during an Applied Video Game for Anxiety Prevention Predict Successful Intervention Outcomes

    Wols, A., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., Schoneveld, E. A., & Granic, I. (2018). Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-018-9684-4

    Author: Aniek Wols

    Upload date: 06-11-2018

  • Preventing Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Is an Applied Game as Effective as a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Program?

    Schoneveld, E. A., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., & Granic, I. (2017). Prevention Science, 1-13.

    Author: Elke Schoneveld

    Upload date: 09-27-2017

  • A Neurofeedback Video Game (MindLight) to Prevent Anxiety in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Schoneveld, E. A., Malmberg, M., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., Verheijen, G. P., Engels, R. C., & Granic, I. (2016). Computers in Human Behavior, 63, 321-333.

    Author: Elke Schoneveld

    Upload date: 10-01-2016

  • Preventing Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Is an Applied Game as Effective as a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Program?

    Schoneveld, E. A., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., & Granic, I. (2017). Prevention Science, 1-13.

    Author: Elke Schoneveld

    Upload date: 09-27-2017

  • Explicit Mental Health Messaging Promotes Serious Video Game Selection in Youth with Elevated Mental Health Symptoms

    Poppelaars, M., Wols, A., Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A., & Granic, I. (2018). Frontiers in Psychology.

    Author: Marlou Poppelaars

    Upload date: 09-10-2018

Worked together with

PhD-candidate interested in how and why applied games for mental health work.

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PhD-Candidate

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Isabela Granic

Professor and Chair of the Developmental Psychopathology department in the Behavioural Science Institute; writer; voracious podcast consumer; mother of two upstanding little gamers

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Director of GEMH Lab

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Elke Schoneveld

PhD-candidate and psychologist interested in the effect of games on mental health in youth. Likes why-questions, social impact and multidisciplinary collaboration. Bubbly, (not so crazy) cat lady and outdoor enthusiast.

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PhD-Candidate

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Marlou Poppelaars

PhD Candidate passionate about psychopathology prevention, intrinsic motivation and the use of video games for this purpose. Loves to read, cook and making sure that bomb does not explode.

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PhD-Candidate

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Marieke van Rooij

Assistant prof. and data geek at the GEMH lab, dynamical modelling, personalisation, wants to put the I back into AI, news junkie, cat lover.

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Assistant Professor

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Shengnan Chen

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Research Master's Student

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Rutger Engels

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CEO at Trimbos Institute / Professor Developmental Psychopathology Utrecht University

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Marloes Kleinjan

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Program Head Epidemiology & Research support at Trimbos Institute / Professor Youth Mental Health Promotion Utrecht University

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